Gallery

Artists, artisans, and craftspeople wind up filling their spaces. As a result, the walls and floor become littered with drawings, painting, pottery, or carving. Visiting them, you might wonder who does the dusting?

Whack!

You can't carve without removing wood. And removing wood can be as delicate a process as lightly slipping the gouge through the wood or propelling it forcefully. Apply too much force in the wrong situation, and you have lovely kindling.

Schooner

I posted on using cement on the end grain of a small schooner I was working on a while ago. The logic was that this particular carving would have lots of unsupported end-grain prone to breakage while I was carving.

Little

Work in small dimensions doesn't seem to be as impressive as more substantial work, but it requires thoughtful attention to detail and forces us to focus our skills. Doing small versions also can be a way of working out design elements for later work when you scale up your design.

A Halibut Schooner

There is no definitive book on halibut schooners. It's hard to define a "type" there is so much variation. Some are transom sterned, but others like the one I've carved are canoe sterned. All had moderate deadrise ( not flat bottomed), and tended to be plumb stemmed, but not always. See the problem?